Assistive Technology
for All

Welcome to the Assistive Technology for All (ATFA) campaign. We want to ensure that those of us who need assistive technology can get it. We want to ensure that it is affordable and provided when we need it. We can’t do this on our own, so we are asking for your help.

Join us!
ATFA

What is assistive technology?

Assistive technology (AT) is any piece of equipment that helps a person to perform an everyday task that they cannot do due to ageing, frailty, injury or disability.

It can include screen-reading software, mobility aids, electronic communication devices, motorised wheelchairs and prosthetic aids. Assistive technology can be expensive —with a typical motorised wheelchair costing about $20,000 — but it allows those of us with a disability to be independent and take part in everyday life.

An accessible bathroom in someone's home. It shows a handrail on either side of the toilet and a raised hand-basin allowing a wheelchair to pull up to use it.
A pair of hands using computer with braille computer display and a computer keyboard.

Why do we need Assistive Technology for All?

If you are an older Australian, getting access to assistive technology is hard. And getting the money to pay for it can be just as tough.

People who qualify for the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) get well-funded and dedicated access to assistive technology. But the NDIS was only ever meant to support about 10 per cent of people with disability.  People older than 65 do not qualify for the NDIS. 

In many cases, this means that older Australians with a disability may wait upwards of 18 months for funding for assistive technology, it means paying for it ourselves or just going without. Assistive technology benefits us and our communities. It allows us to stay involved in public life, stay working if we want to, remain in our homes, and look after ourselves.

Our campaign is called Assistive Technology for All as the issue also affects people under 65 who do not qualify for the NDIS. It has been estimated that about 800,000 people with disability under 65 will not be eligible for the NDIS.

Why do we need Assistive Technology for All?

If you are an older Australian, getting access to assistive technology is hard. And getting the money to pay for it can be just as tough.

People who qualify for the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) get well-funded and dedicated access to assistive technology. But the NDIS was only ever meant to support about 10 per cent of people with disability.  People older than 65 do not qualify for the NDIS. 

If you are an older Australian, getting access to assistive technology is hard. And getting the money to pay for it can be just as tough.

People who qualify for the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) get well-funded and dedicated access to assistive technology. But the NDIS was only ever meant to support about 10 per cent of people with disability.  People older than 65 do not qualify for the NDIS. 

An older woman is fitted with a hearing aid.

In many cases, this means that older Australians with a disability may wait upwards of 18 months for funding for assistive technology, it means paying for it ourselves or just going without. Assistive technology benefits us and our communities. It allows us to stay involved in public life, stay working if we want to, remain in our homes, and look after ourselves.

Our campaign is called Assistive Technology for All as the issue also affects people under 65 who do not qualify for the NDIS. It has been estimated that about 800,000 people with disability under 65 will not be eligible for the NDIS.

What do we want?

We want people with disability who are not eligible for the NDIS to stop falling through the cracks. We want these people to have equitable access to the assistive technology they need to lead full and active lives. Our campaign is asking the Australian Government to establish a single National Assistive Technology Program for all people who are not eligible for the NDIS, younger and older.

An older man sits on his mobility scooter with his granddaughter. They're on a footpath lined with palm trees.
Robert, aged 67, stands in his garden in shorts with his prosthetic leg visible.
Steve, aged 56, in his workshop. His prosthetic leg is visible under his shorts.

Meet Robert and Steve

Robert and Steve have both had their left legs amputated because of aggressive infections. Although only nine years apart, their age difference has led to very different experiences accessing assistive technology.

Come along on the journey and help us create the change!